£265 fee to hang a charity banner

A Hampshire man who lets charities hang posters on his garden fence has been told by the council he needs to pay for advertising consent.

Karl and Samantha Kerry have lived in their home on a main road in Fareham for four years. All that time they have allowed local groups to advertise events on their fence for free. But now the local council wants to charge a £265 fee.

Kerry said he understood he was continuing the tradition of the former owners when he first allowed a charity fundraiser to hang a banner on the fence.

But last month Fareham Borough Council wrote to Kerry asking him to pay for the advertising.

He said: "I'm doing a service to the community - not enough people in this world do things for free."

A council spokesman said it was "simply doing what the Government told us to do". He added that if Kerry could prove the site had been used for display continuously since before 1974, the council would have no control.

Kerry said he had found one person to testify that this is the case, but needed a second.

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