Amnesty's charitable arm might expand its activities

Human rights organisation hopes transfer of projects from its non-charitble arm will allow it to claim more Gift Aid

Martin Tyler, director of corporate services, Amnesty International UK
Martin Tyler, director of corporate services, Amnesty International UK

Amnesty International UK, the human rights charity, might transfer some of its work from its non-charitable to its charitable arm in a move designed to allow it to claim more Gift Aid.

The organisation is split into two sections: a charitable trust that funds some of its projects and a company that carries out campaigning work that charities are prevented from doing by law.

Martin Tyler, director of corporate services at Amnesty International UK, told Third Sector the two sections raised roughly equal amounts of money each year. He said the non-charitable section carried out some work that the Charity Commission might class as charitable.

Allowing the charitable arm to do this work would mean it could claim Gift Aid on more donations, he said. He warned, however, that it could also reduce the amount the non-charitable arm could claim back in VAT.

"Some of our campaigning work can be deemed as charitable," he said. "We don’t know yet how much money we would save by transferring the work, but we are trying to calculate this."

Tyler said initial plans for transferring the work were due to be ready by the end of March.

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