Asheem Singh leaves Acevo to start social tech body

The former interim chief executive of the body for charity leaders is also about to publish his first book

Asheem Singh
Asheem Singh

The former interim chief executive of the charity leaders body Acevo has left the charity to start his own social tech organisation.

Asheem Singh joined Acevo as director of public policy in 2013 and was appointed interim chief executive last summer after the departure of the long-serving chief executive Sir Stephen Bubb.

Before joining Acevo, Singh was director of policy and strategy at the venture philanthropy fund the Impetus Trust and was deputy director at the London-based think tank ResPublica.

During his time as interim chief executive, Acevo and other voluntary sector organisations successfully lobbied the government to quash the anti-advocacy clause.

Singh guided Acevo through several elections, including the general election in 2015, in his former role as director of public policy. Acevo said he also conceived and delivered its Better Public Services and Loneliness commissions.

Singh was replaced as chief executive of Acevo at the end of January by Vicky Browning, the former chief executive of CharityComms, the membership network for charity communications professionals.

Singh said in a statement that he was working on developing a hyperlocal social tech start-up called www.gotilo.org, which would bring social enterprises and charities to mainstream attention, and that his first book The Moral Marketplace, which outlines an ambitious vision for the role of social leadership in wider society, would be published in September.

Acevo said in a statement: "The board and Acevo’s new chief executive Vicky Browning would like to thank Ash for the contribution he has made over the past three and a half years. We appreciate his commitment to Acevo and its members, and we wish him well for the future."

Singh said in a statement: "It has been a wonderful three and a half years at Acevo and I have enjoyed every minute of serving our nation's social leaders and change-makers. We are now at a crossroads where our nation and the wider world face formidable threats to our sense of solidarity and social progress, and I want to play an active part in helping to scope our future for the better."

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