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Big Lottery Fund gives £29m to 788 organisations that face cuts

It has also added £25m to two other programmes and awarded £20m to organisations that offer additional support to grant recipients

Big Lottery Fund
Big Lottery Fund

The Big Lottery Fund has given out grants totalling almost £29m to 788 organisations affected by public funding cuts or facing an increase in demand for their services.

It announced today that it had handed out an extra year’s funding, worth between about £30,000 and £400,000, to 214 organisations as part of its £70m Supporting Change & Impact programme.

A further 574 organisations have received small grants of up to £10,000 to help them review their work and find ways of becoming more sustainable.

The programme was announced in October and organisations had to apply to receive funding. To be eligible, an organisation must have been awarded a grant of more than £10,000 from the BLF, be in the final 18 months of that funding and have been judged by the BLF to be managing that funding well.

In addition to the £29m of grants, the BLF has added a total of £25m to its Reaching Communities and Awards for All programmes, which will be used to fund an additional 1,200 charitable and community projects.

It has also awarded almost £20m to organisations that manage funding on the BLF’s behalf to offer additional support to grant recipients, including Mind, Groundwork and Age UK.

Nat Sloane, chair of the BLF’s England committee, said the organisation was "only too aware of the increasing pressures facing organisations across the sector as the full effect of public funding cuts comes to bear.

"This funding package responds to the concerns of our grant-holders as they struggle to continue their work providing vital support and services to thousands of vulnerable and disadvantaged people across the country.

"It gives an extra year’s funding support to a number of organisations that we see are having a particularly significant impact on their beneficiaries. Importantly, it also gives groups some much-needed time and space to plan for the future and explore ways of making their projects more sustainable, whether that be developing more effective operating models, partnership working or finding new ways to deliver activities in future."

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