Big Lottery Fund launches £30m grant fund for people in crisis because of hardship

The BLF will award between £300,000 and £500,000 to schemes in England that provide immediate and longer-term support for people suffering through family breakdown, homelessness or debt

BLF: new fund
BLF: new fund

The Big Lottery Fund has launched a new £30m grant fund for projects designed to help people in crisis as a result of hardship.

The grant-maker said the fund, which opened today, will take applications for grants of between £300,000 and £500,000 for schemes in England that will provide immediate support, such as food parcels or overnight accommodation, and then offer advocacy or advice on underlying reasons, such as family breakdown, homelessness or debt, through advocacy or advice.

The BLF said projects could include schemes such as GPs working with partner agencies to refer people for advocacy and advice or specialist legal experts working with disabled people who are experiencing hardship.

Organisations running the schemes will need to have experience in providing hardship services so they can start helping people immeidately, the BLF said.

Successful schemes are expected to be funded over five years and will need to demonstrate working in partnership with local organisations.

Nat Sloane, chair of Big Lottery Fund England, said in a statement: "With this new funding, groups will be able to use their local knowledge to support those that need it most, helping people not only out of a crisis situation, but by addressing the underlying causes of their situation, empowering them to improve their lives and their futures."

The closing date for initial applications is 26 August. For more information, click here.

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