Cancer charity coalition ‘difficult for government to ignore'

A coalition of 34 national cancer charities is today launching its own 'white paper' on cancer services.

The Cancer Campaigning Group will present its proposals on what should be in the Government’s new cancer reform strategy document, due to be published in the autumn, at an event in Parliament hosted by the chair of the all-party Parliamentary Cancer Group, Ian Gibson.

MacMillian Cancer Support’s public affairs manager, Gus Baldwin, said it was highly significant that the white paper had been produced by a coalition of charities. “The white paper wouldn’t have happened without the whole sector working together, and this has made it difficult for the government to ignore us,” he said.

He added that the coalition had been extremely harmonious, operating on a one-member, one-vote system.
“It has been about the bigger charities making sure they didn’t speak on behalf if the whole sector,” he said. “The fact that so many chief executives have signed up makes it incredibly powerful.”

National cancer director Professor Mike Richards, who will also be present at the launch, said: “This is a great example of how charities can work together effectively. The voluntary sector makes a vital contribution to cancer services in England, and the expertise represented in these proposals is significant and welcome.”

The white paper is the culmination of a year-long consultation process undertaken by the coalition with patients, carers, health professionals and other cancer experts. It will contain proposals on reducing mortality rates and current inequities in cancer care.

The white paper, Getting it Right for People with Cancer: What the Voluntary Sector wants from the Cancer Reform Strategy, can be downloaded from the CCG's website. It can also be obtained by calling Mary Teeter on 020 7344 1345, or by emailing mary.teeter@edelman.com.

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