Cancer Research UK's income reached £635m last year

This represented a 4 per cent increase, say the latest accounts; expenditure was up by 3 per cent and staff numbers fell from 3,581 to 3,263

Cancer Research UK 2015/16 annual report
Cancer Research UK 2015/16 annual report

Cancer Research UK’s income increased by 4 per cent to £635m last year, the charity’s latest accounts show.

The accounts, which were released today and cover the year to 31 March 2016, show that its expenditure was £658m, a 3 per cent increase on the previous year.

The charity’s income from donations and legacies rose from £424m to £433.6m, including a rise of £11m in legacy income, to £177.8m.

CRUK spent £106.9m on raising funds, the accounts show, up slightly from £105.2m last year.

They also show that the overall number of staff at the charity fell from 3,581 in 2014/15 to 3,263 this year.

The charity said the cut in numbers occurred because of the transfer of staff to the Francis Crick Institute on 1 April 2015, construction of which is expected to be completed later this year.

The accounts also reveal that the charity’s chief executive and chief finance officer were paid £283,000 and £192,000 respectively, once pension contributions are taken into account.

The charity has invested £15m in major centres in Oxford, Cambridge and Manchester in the past year and launched the "Grand Challenge" – a £100m funding scheme to tackle some of the biggest questions in cancer research.

Writing in the charity’s annual report, Michael Pragnell, chair of CRUK, says: "When I took the chair in late 2010, the UK had entered an uncertain economic period. Nonetheless, steady growth in the charity’s income over the past six years, coupled with significantly stronger reserves, has enabled substantial increases in research expenditure."

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