The charitable side of ... Jonathan Ross

Indira Das-Gupta

Leaked details of his BBC earnings made Wossy headline news. But he also does his bit for charity.

BBC internal documents leaked last week revealed that presenter Jonathan Ross earns £530,000 for hosting his Radio 2 show for a mere three hours each Saturday. Little wonder he was voted the second smuggest person in the world after singer Robbie Williams in a recent Time Out poll.

And Wossy's already over-inflated bank balance looks like it will soon rival the GDP of a small South American country as the BBC, ITV and Channel 4 engage in a bidding war to sign him up.

The floppy-fringed presenter is best known for the risque jokes that incur the wrath of the politically correct brigade, and even has a band on his show, Friday Night With Jonathan Ross, called 4 Poofs & a Piano.

But behind the provocative on-screen persona, Ross is actually the committed supporter of a number of low-profile causes. He has been a trustee of a small charity called the UK Lowe Syndrome Trust for six years, and once launched an appeal for funds on his show.

The charity offers support to parents of children affected by Lowe Syndrome, an incurable genetic disorder that affects the eyes, brain and kidneys; it is also known as Oculo-Cerebro-Renal Syndrome.

A spokeswoman for the charity was reluctant to comment, but said that Ross's involvement had been "instrumental".

Celebrity contact service Red Pages also lists the Rhys Daniels Trust as one of his interests.

A spokesman said: "He hosted a celebrity ball for us some years ago and became quite involved with the charity. He has also donated a number of items for auction over the years."

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus
Follow us on:
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google +

Latest Jobs

RSS Feed

Third Sector Insight

Sponsored webcasts, surveys and expert reports from Third Sector partners

Markel

Expert Hub

Insurance advice from Markel

Cyber and data security - how prepared is your charity?

With a 35 per cent rise in instances of data breaches in Q2 and Q3 last year, charities must take cyber security seriously

Third Sector Logo

Get our bulletins. Read more articles. Join a growing community of Third Sector professionals

Register now