Charities could raise more by offering contactless donations, research indicates

Data from the Nationwide Building Society show that smartphone and contactless technology is playing an ever greater role in people's daily lives

Charities could more than double the donations they receive by using contactless payment, research suggests.

A survey conducted by Nationwide Current Accounts has revealed that those who make digital donations give an average of £5.47, compared with £2.34 for those who use cash.

Nationwide's research also showed that smartphones are playing an increasingly important role in people’s everyday lives, with its customer data showing a 365 per cent increase in the use of mobile payments in the past year.

Almost a third of respondents to research carried out by Nationwide said that they regarded their mobile phone as their most important everyday possession – a figure that rose to 54 per cent for 18 to 24-year-olds.

Its research showed that, on average, people believed smartphones would replace debit cards, credit cards and cash within six years.

To help demonstrate its research findings, Nationwide asked the singer Peter Andre to busk in aid of its partner charity, Shelter, with passers-by able to donate using contactless. The impromptu gig, which attracted some negative media attention for the sums allegedly paid to Andre for his work, raised £260 in 15 minutes.

Paul Horlock, director of payments at Nationwide Building Society, said: "Mobile phones are increasingly becoming our go-to devices for living our day-to-day lives, helping us navigate, keep abreast on social media and make quick and easy payments.

"Such is the pace of technology that it is perhaps easy to forget that much of the functionality many of us take for granted is less than 10 years old. Digital wallets were introduced only in the last few years, and now Nationwide members make millions of payments with their phones each and every week, with usage more than trebling in the last year alone."

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