Charity fundraisers 'must prepare for Generation C'

Those that invest in digital media will reap rewards, expert tells delegates at Institute of Fundraising National Convention

Young people's focus on social networking offers charities new opportunities to raise money, but only if they embrace new forms of media, the Institute of Fundraising National Convention heard yesterday.

John Baguley, director of the International Fundraising Consultancy, said Generation C - people born between 1978 and 1994 and sometimes called Generation Y - were more in touch with their peers than previous generations.

He told delegates at a workshop on generational fundraising that Generation C had a willingness to collaborate and share content via new media platforms, in particular mobile phones, in a way that could be useful to charities.

"Unlike Generation X – people born between 1965 and 1977 – they do not use new media as a tool to an end. For them it is where they live," he said.

He said charities should start experimenting with new fundraising techniques designed to reach this new generation of adults so they could reap the benefits when members of Generation C begin to earn more money as they get older.

Jo Swinhoe, director of fundraising and marketing at the Alzheimer's Society, challenged the institute during the closing plenary session to set up a mentoring scheme for fundraisers.

Swinhoe said she would "be angry" if the scheme was not in place in time for the conference next year.

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