Charity gardens scoop awards at Chelsea

Charities have enjoyed considerable success at this year's Chelsea Flower Show, with Cancer Research UK winning a gold medal. Charities Aid Foundation, the Children's Society and Amnesty International each won silver for their gardens.

Cancer Research UK's garden
Cancer Research UK's garden
CRUK’s garden, which was entirely paid for by a private sponsor, is designed to tie in with the charity’s Together We Will Beat Cancer campaign, featuring interlinked hedges, paths, benches and a 100-foot-long oak ribbon symbolising togetherness.

A spokeswoman said the garden, which won top prize in the ‘show gardens’ category for the second year running, was designed to raise awareness of the charity among the flower show’s affluent visitors.

“Having a garden at the Chelsea Flower Show enables us to communicate our key messages face-to-face with more than 170,000 people who visit the garden,” she said. “We believe that potentially many new supporters will be amongst those people.”

Last year’s show generated an advertising value for the charity worth over £3m reaching a potential audience 166m people, she added, with the garden featuring 14 times on TV and 20 times in national newspapers.

The Charities Aid Foundation’s Garden for Giving, based on the children’s book Where the Wild Things are, won a silver medal in the ‘courtyard garden’ category.

A spokeswoman said the theme of the garden is ‘growing your giving’, and is aimed at children because CAF wants parents to introduce their offspring to giving at an early age.

Meanwhile, the Children's Society’s ‘Lust for Life’ garden, based on the Iggy Pop song, won a silver medal in the ‘chic gardens’ category, while Amnesty International’s Garden for Human Rights, featuring a steel oak tree sculpture of the charity’s candle and barbed wire symbol, also won a silver medal in the ‘show gardens’ category. After the show ends it will be transferred to the charity’s London headquarters, where it will be a rooftop garden for staff, volunteers and visitors.

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