Charity staff morale at all-time low, survey finds

Early results from annual Charity Pulse survey reveal that only 29 per cent of employees think spirits are high in their organisations

Charity Pulse survey is open
Charity Pulse survey is open

Charity employees’ morale has hit an all time low, according to initial results from Charity Pulse, the annual survey of voluntary sector employees carried out by Third Sector with Birdsong Charity Consulting.

Early results from the survey, which is open until 13 April, show the percentage of respondents who think morale in their charity is high has fallen from 43 per cent in 2011 to 29 per cent this year so far.

In the past five years, between 50 and 43 per cent of employees thought spirits were high in their organisations.

The survey, established to build a picture of working life in the voluntary sector, has been run every year since 2007. 

The proportion of early respondents to this year’s research who would recommend their organisation to a friend has fallen to a low of 56 per cent, down from 70 per cent last year.

Half of the people who have taken the survey so far said their pay had been frozen.

The proportion who thought their pay was competitive with others doing similar work in the sector also dropped to its worst ever level of 42 per cent, down from 47 per cent in 2011.

Fewer people have so far indicated that they feel appreciated at work this year compared with previous years and a lower percentage rated their senior management teams highly.

Respond to the survey here.

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