Charles Kenyon's Country Diary: We throw away enough food to feed every child

At Christmas, we will have wasted more food than ever, writes our columnist

This is the season for spending a lot of money on food and throwing a third of it away. According to the Daily Mail, we will have wasted £600m on Christmas Day alone. In our home we eat our own lamb, beef, vegetables and fruit. It seems rather bad manners to throw away what you have reared and grown, so we try not to.

We know that we are much luckier than most people in the world who yearn to be able to eat their own produce. That is why the Food Awards Company – which is owned and managed from the garden shed at the back of our house and runs three international awards for Food Photography, Bread and Food Entrepreneurs – supports Action Against Hunger. This superb, low-profile and very unflashy charity runs international humanitarian projects committed to ending child hunger by carrying out long-term projects in more than 45 countries around the world, benefiting seven million people every year. Long after the headlines have moved on, Action Against Hunger stays.

So from our point of view, it is a matter of acting local and thinking global. How much does it cost to feed a child for a month? £7. That works out as 23p a day, which means that the cost of what we will have thrown away on Christmas Day is enough to feed every child in the world, rich and poor – Boxing Day dinner too, if we add Gift Aid. What could Action Against Hunger do if, for every scrape of the plate, 23p is put to one side? It's worth taking a look at its website.

Charles Kenyon lives near Market Rasen, retiredcolonel@oldvicarage.net

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