Clore Social Leadership Programme announces 18 names for January intake

The programme develops aspiring social leaders, and there are a number of new specialist fellowships this time

The 18 new Clore fellows
The 18 new Clore fellows

The Clore Social Leadership Programme has announced the names of the 18 aspiring social leaders who will join the scheme in January.

The programme – which develops people who have an ambition to lead social change in their communities, organisations and the world around them – was established in 2008 by the Clore Duffield Foundation to improve leadership in the not-for-profit sector.

The new cohort has been recruited from UK-based charities, social enterprises and community organisations.

This year, five specialist fellowships have been awarded for the first time. Among these, the Garfield Weston Foundation has funded a fellowship for an applicant working for an organisation in north-east England, which has been awarded to Emma Frew, chief officer of the Shiney Advice and Resource Project, a community hub based in Sunderland.

Michelle McCrindle, chief executive of Food Train, which delivers groceries to older people, has received a fellowship funded by the John Ellerman Foundation and the Tudor Trust to improve the lives of older people in the UK and to encourage new thinking in the sector.

And the Forces in Mind Trust, which promotes the successful transition of armed forces personnel and their families into civilian life, is funding a specialist fellowship awarded to an applicant committed to working with ex-servicemen. It has been awarded to Jane Rowley, senior research fellow at Staffordshire University, who has worked in the homelessness sector, where she encountered increasing numbers of ex-service personnel.

Dame Mary Marsh, founding director of the programme, said the new cohort would bring the number of social leaders trained under the programme to 101.

"We have a great group of fellows, all of whom we believe are deeply committed to social change," she said. "And we have a new chair in John Kampfner, the critically acclaimed author, broadcaster and commentator specialising in UK politics, international affairs, media and human rights issues."

The programme can be completed over one year or two, depending on whether fellows join on a full or part-time basis. Fellows will attend residential courses, have a dedicated coach and mentor, undertake an extended secondment and engage in action learning sets, focused reflection and practice-based research.

The 2015 fellows

Sarah Beard, business development director, Maggie’s

Jacky Bourke-White, chief executive, Age UK Lewisham and Southwark 

Gary Buxton, chief executive, Young Advisors Charity

Jean Demars, housing lead, Praxis Community Projects

Emma Frew, chief officer, ShARP

Emily Georghiou, local influencing adviser, Age UK

Andrew Jackson, social entrepreneur focusing on youth development, Manchester

Michelle McCrindle, chief executive, Food Train

Claire Morris, global advocacy director, Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance

Samir Nathoo, community development officer, Arsenal in the Community

Jenny O’Hara-Jakeway, Making the Connections team leader, Interlink RCT

Cordelia Osewa-Ediae, operations director, Adab Trust

Sophie Parker, social policy professional and former deputy director, Demos

Jane Rowley, senior research fellow, Staffordshire University

Julia Slay, head of social policy, New Economics Foundation

Deborah Smart, grants manager, Social Investment Business

Hayley Speed, head of health and social care, The Men’s Room

Jo Tilley-Riley, strategic communications manager, Big Society Capital.

- This story was amended on 7 November to make it clear that the funding for the fellowship funded by the Garfield Weston Foundation went to the individual rather than the organisation she worked for.

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