Clore Social Leadership programme seeks more fellows

Bursaries up to £20,000 available to candidates from diverse backgrounds for fellowships backed by Gulbenkian, Paul Hamlyn and Pears foundations, and the RNIB

The Clore Social Leadership Programme is inviting applications for its second round of fellowships.

The programme, established in 2008 to develop leadership in the third sector, will award up to 20 fellowships that will last between one and two years.

The fellowships involve residential courses, mentoring and coaching, an extended secondment and research. They are open to UK residents "working in, or closely with, the third sector" as employees or volunteers. They are backed by bursaries of up to £20,000.

Four specialist fellowships are being offered, sponsored by the Gulbenkian Foundation, the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, RNIB and the Pears Foundation.

Dame Mary Marsh, director of the programme, said: "We are committed to securing a diverse group of fellows - last year, we were delighted to receive 20 per cent of applicants from black, Asian and other minority ethnic backgrounds."

The first batch of 14 fellows started on the programme in January. Current participants include John Ramm, the RNIB fellow, who is researching barriers preventing blind and partially sighted people gaining senior positions in the voluntary sector, and Rowena Lewis, head of fundraising at the Fawcett Society, who is looking into women's participation and representation in the sector.

The Clore Social Leadership Programme was established by the Clore Duffield Foundation, which will contribute £1.5m to the programme in its first three years.

 

Mathew Little recommends

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