Communities and Local Government department led government funding to voluntary sector in 2009/10

The department was the source of more than half of central government funding to the voluntary sector

Communities and Local Government department
Communities and Local Government department

The Communities and Local Government department was the source of more than half of central government funding to the voluntary sector in 2009/10, according to the Office for Civil Society.

The figure is contained in a detailed breakdown of all departmental spending on the sector by the OCS, which leads on the voluntary sector in government.

The breakdown reveals that 13 government departments spent £4.7bn on the voluntary sector in 2009/10. Of this, £2.9bn came from CLG.

The figures were sent to the National Audit Office last year as part of the spending watchdog’s investigation into the Compact, the public and voluntary sector partnership agreement.

The NAO requested the information to help it decide which departments its investigation should focus on.

The NAO forwarded the figures to Third Sector after a request made under the Freedom of Information Act for details of correspondence between it and the OCS relating to the investigation into the Compact.

Central Government’s Implementation of the National Compact, the NAO’s report on the investigation, was published in January.

The OCS data includes: figures for total funding to the sector by each department; the amount awarded directly by each department and by each one’s non-departmental public bodies; the breakdown between grants and contracts; and the percentage of each department’s funding that was awarded for three years or more.

CLG funding amounted to more than that of the other 12 government departments, although the overwhelming majority of it was awarded by non-departmental public bodies, which included local authorities.

The Department for Children, Schools and Families, later renamed the Department for Education, awarded the most departmental funding directly to the sector.

It gave £328m – ahead of the Department for Work and Pensions (£236m) and the Cabinet Office (£179m).

The DWP provided the highest percentage of long-term funding. Ninety-four per cent of its awards were for three years or more; the figure for the Home Office was 42 per cent.

The figures can be viewed in our feature on the NAO investigation here.

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