Coram and Norwood combine adoption services

Carol Homden, chief executive of Coram, says the move will lead to more children being placed with new adoptive parents

Carol Homden
Carol Homden

The Jewish charity Norwood has merged its adoption services team with that of the children’s charity Coram, which runs one of the UK’s biggest voluntary adoption agencies.

The move combines the adoption resources and expertise at both organisations. Coram Adoption North London, incorporating Norwood, opened on 1 April, and is based in Finchley, north London.

The combined organisation will provide adoption services around north London and as far north as Hertfordshire.

"Coram is an organisation with which we have had a longstanding professional relationship for many years," said Elaine Kerr, chief executive of Norwood. "Given Coram's exemplary record and outstanding reputation in the adoption sector, we are assured that it will continue to build on the excellent work of our adoption team of the past 23 years."

A Coram spokeswoman said Norwood had decided to transfer the division because adoption represented only a small part of the Jewish charity’s activities.

"Both organisations are extremely excited about the merger and we are confident it will lead to more children being placed with new adoptive parents," said Carol Homden, chief executive at Coram. "Our key priority is to make this transition as seamless as possible for all of our current and potential adopters, so we can continue to find loving adoptive homes for children."

Coram has an income of £10.9m and employs 264 members of staff. Norwood has a turnover of more than £32m and has more than 1,250 employees.

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