Damian Lewis helps clinch deals in aid of Prostate Cancer UK

Plus: Prince Harry, Cheryl Fernandez-Versini, Helen Mirren, Peter Snow, Simon Armitage, Suranne Jones, Prince William, Plan B

Damian Lewis
Damian Lewis

The actor Damian Lewis helped to clinch deals in aid of Prostate Cancer UK during the 22nd annual ICAP Charity Day, when all of the financial broker's revenues and commissions for that day are donated to charity. Lewis, an ambassador for the charity, was joined on the trading floor by other celebrities, including Prince Harry, the singer Cheryl Fernandez-Versini and the actor Helen Mirren.

A poetry campaign to help homeless veterans is being backed by the broadcaster and military historian Peter Snow and the poet Simon Armitage. Residents of the housing association Riverside read a poem by Edward Thomas, who died in action during the First World War, as part of the Lights On social media campaign to raise awareness of the help that is available to veterans.

The Scott and Bailey actor Suranne Jones has become the first celebrity patron of the Bristol-based charity Penny Brohn Cancer Care. She was introduced to the charity by a friend and was motivated to become patron after helping at events and meeting people who have benefited from its services. Jones said: "It amazes me that such an important charity still has quite low awareness. I think it's really important that more people know about the support it provides, so they can get access to its life-changing services."

Prince William made a return visit to the homeless young people's charity St Basils in Birmingham. He heard from young residents about how the charity was helping to build their confidence and skills through a new programme, delivered in partnership with the University of Birmingham's sports psychology department.

The musician Plan B held a question-and-answer session at the launch of a new youth initiative by the Passion Project, a social engagement programme created to combat youth unemployment. The new digital engagement platform, aimed at 16 to 24-year-olds, identifies a person's skills and matches them with vocational and employment opportunities.

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