Digital round-up: Women's Aid launches online safety guide with Facebook

Plus: NPC publishes global innovations report; Santander releases further £200k via Crowdfunder; and Kidscape works with Theatre Royal on cyber-bullying production

Women’s Aid has launched a new guide to help women stay safe online. The national domestic abuse charity has worked with the social media platform Facebook to produce Empowering Women to be Safe Online and provide women and girls with information on understanding the risks and tools needed to protect themselves on social media. These include advice on how to report something that is abusive and prevent private images from being shared online. Women’s Aid says the guide is designed specifically to offer advice to survivors of domestic abuse because many women who experience domestic abuse do so online.

Caroline Millin, safety policy programmes manager at Facebook, said: "We know that perpetrators of domestic abuse can abuse partners or ex-partners online. This behaviour is unacceptable and against Facebook’s community standards. We’re proud to be working with experts like Women’s Aid to empower women to stay safe online."

New Philanthropy Capital has published a new report examining eight trends in measurement and evaluation in the voluntary sector. Global Innovations in Measurement and Evaluation highlights eight developments that challenge traditional practices. These includes the role of technology: the report details how it is enabling organisations to gather different types of data on bigger scales and how the increased availability of data and processing power allows for new ways of gaining insights. The eight trends that have been identified include user-centric evaluation; shared measurement and evaluation; impact management; data linkage; big data; remote sensing; and data visualisation.

Anne Kazimirski, report co-author and head of measurement and evaluation at NPC, said: "Traditional, resource-intensive and solely retrospective approaches do not meet all our measurement and evaluation needs. New approaches, new technologies and big data are allowing us to measure faster and more effectively, which should help charities to really focus on what works and so increase their impact."

Santander has made a further £200,000 available to social enterprises and community projects after renewing its partnership with Crowdfunder. This is the second phase of its Changemaker Fund after a pilot stage. Projects looking to support disadvantaged people in the UK present their ideas on the Crowdfunder website and receive funds if their ideas are supported by the "crowd". Projects looking for funds of up to £20,000 can apply and, if approved, will receive 50 per cent of their funding requirements from Santander. To date, 33 grants have been provided to projects including Chocolate Worx, a chocolate-maker in Devon that employs disabled people, Change Please in London, which provides training for homeless people to become baristas, and Curiosity Cafe, which supports people with dementia in Northumberland.

The Theatre Royal Haymarket Masterclass Trust is to premiere a new play, Cookies, focusing on the effects and consequences of cyber bullying and other darker aspects of the internet. The play, written by Fringe First Award winner Emily Jenkins, has been commissioned and developed for The Cyberscene Project, an initiative created by the trust in partnership with the children’s charity Kidscape and the Pureland Foundation. The project aims to use theatre to support the health and wellbeing of young people affected by cyber bullying and to raise awareness of both the dangers and positives of being online.

Speaking about the play, Emily Jenkins said: "This play has come directly from what young people shared with me about their daily online lives and their extraordinary and terrifying online experiences. Before we tell them what they should do or how they should behave, we need to listen to what they have to say. This is not my story. It’s theirs."

Two performances of the play will be staged on 29 October.

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