Disasters Emergency Committee appeal for Nepal raises £19m in first 24 hours

The coalition of charities has brought in £14m from members of the public and a further £5m from the government's Aid Match programme to help victims of Saturday's earthquake

Aftermath of the Nepal earthquake
Aftermath of the Nepal earthquake

The Disasters Emergency Committee’s appeal to help victims of the earthquake in Nepal has raised £19m in its first 24 hours – more than the amount raised during the first day of previous DEC appeals for the Philippines typhoon, the east Africa crisis, the earthquake in Haiti and the floods in Pakistan.

The coalition of 13 UK-based humanitarian aid organisations, including ActionAid, Christian Aid and Oxfam, said the money would boost efforts to reach some of the estimated eight million people affected by the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck west of the country’s capital, Kathmandu, on Saturday.

The disaster damaged or destroyed the homes of hundreds of thousands of people, many of them in remote and hard-to-reach villages.

The £19m total includes £14m given by text, phone and online. The other £5m has come from the government through Aid Match, the international development programme that provides match funding to UK-based charities running large-scale appeals relating to one of 26 "priority countries".

Saleh Saeed, chief executive of the DEC, said in a statement: "People in the UK have, once again, shown their generosity by responding to help those whose lives have been devastated by disaster.

"The strong personal TV appeal made by Joanna Lumley last night has really struck a chord with the public. The UK government helped by matching the first £5m worth of donations."

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