Enhance the brands of your corporate partners, Children in Need's Sarah Monteith tells Fundraising Week

Speaking at the Big Donor Summit, the charity's director of marketing and fundraising, says aligning more with companies' brands would bring in more big-donor income

Sarah Monteith
Sarah Monteith

Charities will achieve longer-term and more lucrative corporate partnerships if they are able to enhance the brands of their corporate partners, according to the director of marketing and fundraising at BBC Children in Need.

Sarah Monteith, who was speaking in London today at the Big Donor Summit, part of Third Sector's Fundraising Week, said charities needed to present themselves as being aligned with companies' brands because companies were more focused on their brands than ever before.

"When we look at big donors, we should consider and exploit the trends that are in their world as opposed to the trends that our in our world," she said. "At the moment, the biggest trend I see is that move towards brand. So if we can augment our partners' brands – and we should seek that they also augment our brands – we in turn can drive big-donor income."

She said that charities must "talk about brand language" and think how their brands complemented those of potential corporate partners.

Monteith said she was not being cynical and that all Children in Need's corporate partners and major donors worked with the charity first and foremost because they wanted to help disadvantaged children.

But she said it made sense to emphasise any links between the ideas or "essence" of a charity and a major donor that supported it, because this would probably lead to a bigger, more long-term partnership through which more good could be achieved.

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