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Female sector executives paid a fifth less than male counterparts, survey finds

But the gender pay gap in the voluntary sector is smaller than the national average, according to a Chartered Management Institute report

Gender pay gap
Gender pay gap

Women working at executive level in charities are paid an average of £6,807 less than their male counterparts, new research shows.

The figure is revealed in the Chartered Management Institute’s annual Gender Salary Survey, which was published yesterday. 

It shows that male executives in the voluntary sector earned on average a basic annual salary of £36,250, whereas women at the same level received £29,443 on average – almost 19 per cent less.

But the pay gap among voluntary sector employees is smaller than the national average, which includes private firms, of £10,060.

Researchers spoke to 2,861 people in third sector jobs in the UK as part of a wider survey of nearly 39,000 executives across all employment sectors.

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