Few think charities will benefit from London Olympics, survey finds

Research consultancy nfpSynergy polled 1,035 members of the public to find their views on London 2012

Olympic Park
Olympic Park

Only 4 per cent of respondents to a survey believe the main legacy of the London Olympics will be more volunteering or that the event will lead to more funding for charities, according to a survey published today.

A survey of 1,035 members of the public carried out in July and August by the consultancy nfpSynergy found that they felt sports organisations, schools and charities were the organisations that most deserved to benefit from the games. But only 12 per cent believed that national charities were likely to benefit from the games.

Only 8 per cent could name a charity officially associated with the games, compared with 44 per cent who were able to name a corporate partner.

Only 6 per cent of respondents believed that big business should benefit from the Games, but 39 per cent believed that it would.

"Under a year away, and despite the mounting hype, the British public still sees government debt and associated taxes as the most likely major legacy of the London 2012 Olympic Games," said Joe Saxton, co-founder of nfpSynergy.

Saxton said the results showed that the British public did not expect charities to benefit, but said they "strongly suggest a significant public appetite for a greater off-track ‘Olympic spirit’ – for less of the big business and more of the big heart and charitable soul."

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