Finance: The Numbers - Anthony Nolan Trust

Patrick McCurry

The Anthony Nolan Trust recruits new donors to the UK's largest bone marrow register as well as undertaking research into the effectiveness and safety of bone marrow transplants.

Total income £14.8m (up from £13.4m in 2003). Nearly 60 per cent comes in fees from hospitals using the register.

Highest salary Professor Alejandro Madrigal, research and scientific director, was paid £90,000-£100,000.

Reserves policy Reserves at year-end, excluding fixed assets and restricted funds, were £1.5m, equivalent to about six weeks' unrestricted spending.

The charity's policy is to have reserves of between £800,000 and £2.8m.

Fundraising costs The charity spent £1.2m on fundraising and £1m on its trading subsidiary, which carries out fundraising events. Its fundraised income was £5.6m. This gives it a fundraising ratio of 39p in the pound, slightly less than the year before.

Pension The charity operates a defined contribution scheme and contributes a maximum of 6 per cent of an employee's salary based on seniority and length of service.

How performance is communicated The annual report is rather dry but the annual review makes good use of graphics to describe the charity's work.

The review explains the charity's aim of recruiting younger bone marrow donors. The charity carried out a review of its communications and has shifted its focus to address gaps in awareness of the bone marrow register among the general public and young men in particular. The reports are available online at www.anthonynolan.org.uk.

The charity says We undertook a substantially events-based campaign to raise funds because we believe that high-profile events in the community provide good publicity and help recruit donors to the register. Such events do provide a wider benefit for the charity.

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