Focus: Finance and Governance - The Numbers - Breast Cancer Haven

Patrick McCurry

Offers information, counselling, education and complementary therapies to people affected by breast cancer.

Total income: £1.2m, up from £1.1m in 2004.

Highest salary: Chief executive Paul Arengo-Jones was paid between £50,000 and £60,000.

Reserves policy: The charity aims to maintain free reserves (excluding those invested in tangible fixed assets) equivalent to at least four months' forward cash spending.

Fundraising costs: The charity raised £1.14m in voluntary income (including legacies) and fundraising events, and its fundraising costs were £321,000, giving it a fundraising ratio of 28p in the pound. The ratio in 2004 was 33 per cent.

How performance is communicated

The charity communicates its message well, using accessible language and clear ideas in its literature and on its website. The trustees' report is less dense than those of many other charities and makes a good attempt to link objectives from the previous year with activity in 2004-05. There is a useful list of the charity's six strategic aims for the future. The annual review is well written and presented. The website includes a helpful section on why there is a need for 'havens' - the day centres run by the charity. For more information, www.breastcancerhaven.org.uk.

The charity says: "Our new chief executive joined in June 2004. Since then the emphasis has been on consolidation of operations and the development of sustainable fundraising income. The fundraising team has been expanded, with the events team continuing to run successful events and a permanent post created to raise funds from trusts and foundations. A new post to develop a major donor campaign was created. One of our main aims remains building the Breast Cancer Haven brand as a model of excellence in complementary cancer care."

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