Foundation for Social Improvement gets £200,000 grant to support small charity fundraising

The money will be used to provide 5,000 subsidised training opportunities for small charities over two years

DCMS
DCMS

The government has awarded the Foundation for Social Improvement a £200,000 grant to run a two-year training programme that will help small charities develop fundraising skills.

The foundation, which was created by Emma Harrison, founder of the employment services firm A4e, will run the Department for Culture, Media & Sport programme in partnership with Local Giving, the Small Charities Coalition and the Charity Finance Group.

The aim is to provide 5,000 subsidised training opportunities through events, online learning and mentoring as well as supporting fundraising campaigns. Charities and community groups with annual incomes of up to £1m are eligible for support.

Rob Wilson, the Minister for Civil Society, said he wanted small charities to be "more resilient and sustainable", adding: "This training programme will give them valuable skills so they can continue their vital work helping to support people up and down the country."

Details of training events will be added to the foundation's website.

The foundation, which Harrison established in 2007, has been subject to recent parliamentary questions regarding its relationship with government. In February, the shadow charities minister, Steve Reed, asked how much state funding the organisation had received and whether the Office for Civil Society had engaged in open tendering when making awards.

Wilson said his department had awarded the foundation £148,000 in grants and contracts since 2008. He said ministers had followed a competitive grant process and open tendering.

If you’re interested in fundraising, you can’t miss Third Sector’s Annual Fundraising Conference on 23 and 24 May. Click here for more information and how to book

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