FRSB report will include complaints about legacy fundraising and clothing collections

Members have until 7 March to send in details of complaints they received last year

Alistair McLean, chief executive of the FRSB
Alistair McLean, chief executive of the FRSB

The Fundraising Standards Board will include complaints about legacy fundraising and house-to-house clothing collections for the first time in its Annual Complaints Return 2010.

The FRSB has called on its members to submit their data on fundraising complaints they have received in 2010.

It said the figures, which will be published in the FRSB's annual report in June, will be accompanied for the first time by an analysis of the data and trends by Adrian Sargeant, professor of fundraising at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and of fundraising and non-profit marketing at Bristol Business School.

Alistair McLean, chief executive of the FRSB, said one aim of the return was to gauge public opinion about various methods of fundraising.

"By expanding the breadth and detail of the returns, we hope our members will be able to provide further critical information that will help shape best practice guidance in the future, ultimately ensuring that complaints are kept to an absolute minimum," he said.

Sargeant said tracking public satisfaction would help fundraisers find out if they were heading in the right direction.

"Only when we understand the areas where we're weak can we begin to develop our professional practice and improve public confidence as a consequence," he said.

All FRSB members who joined before July last year have until 7 March to submit their compulsory complaints returns.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus