FUNDRAISING NEWS: Campaign Watch - Just Breaking

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Art charity Tate is planning to turn signatures into art with its latest direct mail campaign, which aims to persuade recent donors to sign up to Gift Aid.

The mailout is the second phase of the campaign. The first raised £140,000 for Tate's four galleries after garnering a 30 per cent response rate from the charity's members in January.

Bluefrog designed the mailer, which was posted last week to the 30,000 members, who failed to respond the first time. The agency has deliberately avoided setting a target because it suspects the response will be lower as a result of approaching the same people again.

Simplicity was the key to the success of the last campaign, which will again offer recipients a die-cut leaflet, printed to appear as a picture frame around a signature box. Words below the window state: '£11.20 if you sign here,' encouraging the donor to simply add their signature and return by post to recoup the charity 28p per £1 of their membership fees.

To reduce print and postage costs, the new mailout is a one-piece, contrary to January's pack, which carried a freepost reply envelope. "We had to maintain the focus on keeping it as simple as possible and not move away from the concept of opening and signing a piece of paper," said James Briggs, head of creative strategy at Bluefrog.

As the mailer lands on doorsteps, recipients will be confronted with the question: 'Do you know how much your signature is worth?'. "We have dispelled concerns over security by designing the one-piece so that it folds to stick to itself and conceal members' details," said Briggs.

The campaign also includes posters and leaflets installed next to Gift Aid posters at all of Tate's galleries, encouraging members to sign a Gift Aid form during their visit. Alternatively, they can take a leaflet away and register via post, a freephone number or online.

Susie Dawson, membership manager at Tate, said: "Bluefrog has devised an original and fresh approach,that stands out from the clutter and drives home our message very effectively."

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