Giant sand map marks 50 years National Trust's Neptune Coastline Campaign

Plus: dancers take over the Tate Modern; and an electric run lights up London in aid of Breast Cancer Care

A giant map of the UK and Ireland was etched onto the sand at Whiteford Burrows in Gower, south Wales, to mark the 50th anniversary of the National Trust's Neptune Coastline Campaign. The sand artist Marc Treanor and a team of local volunteers worked for six hours to create the image, which is adorned with sandcastles and flags to represent 50 of the best-loved areas along the 775 miles of coastline that have been saved by the campaign. Whiteford Burrows was, in 1965, the first area to be protected by the project.

Dancers will take over the Tate Modern to transform it into the Musee de la danse (dance museum) for two days in May. The French choreographer Boris Charmatz will lead a team of more than 75 dancers in a series of performances that will take place throughout the building, including the Turbine Hall (right), which will be transformed into a nightclub dance floor. The event is part of the BMW Tate Live performance programme.

It will soon be time to cover yourself in glow sticks, LEDs or anything else that shines or blinks and run to pumping music at the Electric Run London. Breast Cancer Care is the official charity partner of the glow-in-the-dark 5km fun run, to be held at Wembley Stadium in north-west London in May. Lights and lasers will show participants the way, but they would be wise to conserve some energy because, after dancing across the finish line, they'll be rewarded with a party featuring live DJs. Details of similar events taking place in Manchester and Glasgow will be announced soon.

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