Guide Dogs aims to show what it's like for a Paralympian to grow up with sight loss

The charity launches an emotional and sensory experience that challenges viewers to see how they would feel facing the world as a blind child

Guide Dogs, the charity that supports the visually impaired, has launched a video demonstrating what life was like for a Paralympian who grew up with sight loss.

Created by Don’t Panic, the video was launched on Thursday before the start of the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro and tells the story of partially sighted sprinter Libby Clegg.

The two-and-a-half minute video, which has no images for the first two minutes, uses binaural audio to explain how Clegg defeated the stigma of sight loss and achieved her goals. 

A dramatisation of Clegg’s childhood is heard, including the support she received from her friends and family and the trauma she experienced from school bullies and discouraging teachers.

The film ends with visuals of Clegg’s 2014 Commonwealth Games victory in the 100m event and closes with a shot of her and her guide dog.

George McCallum at Don’t Panic created the campaign, which was produced by Angelsound.

Nick Hodder, head of digital at Guide Dogs, says: "This is the first time we’ve created a video that tries to put the viewer directly into the world of someone with sight loss. It’s a really engaging emotional and sensory experience where we’re asking viewers to challenge themselves to see how they would feel facing the world as a blind child. 

"We want to increase understanding of the challenges that people with sight loss face, but also tackle preconceptions about what they can achieve. It’s a fantastic story of determination and ambition."

This article first appeared on Campaign

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