Institute of Fundraising: A fond farewell to the Giving Campaign

Tonight sees the last hurrah of the Giving Campaign. The campaign has always been determined that it should have a set time of existence, but I suspect people are going to question, even more than we have done, why it didn't carry on.

When you look at all it has achieved, it has to be seen as a huge success.

Of course, there is always more that could have been done, but just consider the following - by no means exhaustive - achievements.

Giving Nation is an initiative to put charities and giving firmly on the agenda for future generations. It has worked successfully to include materials within the National Curriculum and has developed a relationship with a huge number of schools across the UK.

Another development for the long term has been the investment in charity financial products and the work with the financial services industry.

A small, but important, illustration of this is that independent financial advisers now have tax-efficient giving included in their training and exams. Combined with the marketing and promotions work of the Gift Aid logo and the PR based around giving, its impact is considerable.

As this is written, the Daily Mirror has a double page spread about tax-effective giving. The Sunday Times Rich List outlines those who gave the most, and there are more articles in general about the wealthy giving.

The legacy of the Giving Campaign will be measured for a long time to come but, before all this kicks in, the toolkits and resources helping charities to manage gift aid reclaims, set up payroll giving schemes and supporting their trustees are free and readily available.

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