IoF and Small Charities Coalition to hold forum for small charities on fundraising reforms

The move comes after complaints that small charities were not invited to the fundraising summit organised by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations

Two organisations to hold forum
Two organisations to hold forum

The Institute of Fundraising and the Small Charities Coalition have announced that they will hold a forum where small charities will be able to discuss fundraising reforms.

The move comes after complaints that small charities were not invited to next month’s fundraising summit organised by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations.

The event will take place after the NCVO’s summit, which will be held on 4 December with the chief executives of the 50 largest fundraising charities.

A spokesman for the IoF told Third Sector that a date for the forum had not yet been decided, but it was expected to be in the first half of December.

Asked how the bodies would decide which organisations could attend, he said the bodies wanted to gauge interest before they determined the size and nature of the forum. But he said the aim was to make sure that all organisations with an interest in contributing were able to do so. "If we find that we are oversubscribed, then we certainly wouldn’t rule out holding a second event," he said.

He was unable to confirm whether the event would be open to the press.

The IoF and the SCC will also run an online survey at about the same time to capture smaller charities’ views about the new system of fundraising regulation, which is being established in the wake of Sir Stuart Etherington’s review.

The bodies said they hoped the event and the survey would be complementary to the work being carried out to establish the new fundraising regulator and would provide additional intelligence and information to feed in to discussions about the proposed Fundraising Preference Service.

Danielle Atkinson, an IoF trustee and director of public fundraising at Breast Cancer Now, was among the critics of NCVO’s decision not to invite smaller charities to its event, according to comments made on Third Sector’s article about the summit, while the fundraising consultant and academic Adrian Sargeant also expressed his irritation at the move on Twitter.

A spokesman for the NCVO told Third Sector that small charities would be represented at its summit by a representative from the Small Charities Coalition and that it would be streamed live for those who could not attend.

"We’re doing all we can to involve charities of all sizes," he said. "We can’t invite everyone because we only have so much space. We’ve started with those charities that are of such a scale that the IoF is asking them to stump up five-figure sums to fund the new regulator’s start-up costs."

The charities that have been invited to the NCVO event are each understood to have been approached by the IoF and the Public Fundraising Association to provide £20,000 toward the establishment of the new regulator.

Daniel Fluskey, head of policy and research at the IoF, said: "We are delighted to be launching this initiative alongside the Small Charities Coalition. Smaller charities make up a huge proportion of the sector. By highlighting the recommendations from and priorities of smaller charities, we can ensure that the new system works best for all fundraising organisations."

John Barrett, acting chief executive at the SCC, said: "It is important that any new system of fundraising regulation is fair and proportionate to small charities’ methods and resources. We look forward to sharing the views, opinions and recommendations from this consultation with the new Fundraising Regulator.

Charities interested in attending the forum should email

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