Kingston Smith
Kingston Smith

The accountancy firm Kingston Smith is inviting applications to be its first charity partner in an arrangement likely to be worth at least £75,000 to the chosen charity.

The partnership will initially run until December 2017, and Kingston Smith told Third Sector it expects to raise at least £75,000 for the charity.

The firm also said it hopes to start the partnership in September, weeks after the deadline for applications on 31 August.

The charity partner will receive support from Kingston Smith, including staff volunteering, fundraising events and donations, logistical and practical support and access to other skills and advice from the firm.

The successful charity will have to meet certain criteria, including that it has projects that Kingston Smith can actively support through fundraising, volunteering or pro bono support.

The charity partner must also be based in or around London, or be a national charity headquartered in London. It must be of a size where Kingston Smith's support can make a real difference.

Kingston Smith also stipulates that prospective charity partners must address social disadvantage in an innovative way and allocate an account manager to work with the firm.

Martin Muirhead, senior partner at Kingston Smith, said: "As a firm, we have always been passionate about supporting charities and committed to the communities that we serve, with several long-term volunteering and fundraising initiatives in place.

"We are thrilled to be launching this new charity partner programme, which will help provide a specific focus for our people to engage with on many levels. We look forward to partnering with a charity to help support them in reaching their potential."

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