Let charity lotteries raise as much money as the National Lottery, survey respondents say

In a poll carried out by the consultancy nfpSynergy, most respondents say they oppose any restrictions on charity lotteries

National Lottery
National Lottery

Three out of four people feel that charity lotteries should be free to raise as much money as the National Lottery, research shows.

A survey of 1,000 people, published today by the research consultancy nfpSynergy, found that 74 per cent of respondents felt there should not be any laws preventing charities from raising as much as the National Lottery.

Only 9 per cent said they wanted laws and regulations to make it harder for charity lotteries to compete with the National Lottery.

The survey found that 63 per cent of respondents were opposed to any regulations that would make it difficult for charity lotteries to compete with the National Lottery.

The existing restrictions on charities limit the maximum total value of tickets that can be sold across all lotteries a charity runs to £10m a year, with prize money also restricted. Ticket sales for each individual lottery are limited to £4m year.

Charity lottery operators must also ensure that a minimum 20 per cent of the returns go to good causes, referred to as the 80:20 rule.

Joe Saxton, co-founder of nfpSynergy, said the 80:20 rule made it harder for larger charities to use lotteries as a way of increasing their income.

"The National Lottery is nearly 100 times bigger than its nearest competitor," he said. "The total income of the National Lottery is 650 times bigger than the cap of £10m for an individual charity lottery. It is also about 80 to 100 times bigger than the annual income of the multiple society lotteries of the Health Lottery. The annual income of all the charity lotteries is about £300m. Regulation, then, does a pretty good job of making sure the National Lottery is the monopoly supplier."

The research has been released today to coincide with the closure of a consultation on society lotteries by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

The consultation is considering areas such as whether the regulation of society lotteries should be tightened, whether regulation of the amount society lotteries must give to good causes is appropriate and to what extent the National Lottery should be protected from competition.

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