Lidl UK chooses NSPCC as its charity partner

The supermarket chain says it hopes the alliance will raise £3m in three years for the charity's schools service

Christian Härtnagel, left, and Peter Wanless
Christian Härtnagel, left, and Peter Wanless

The NSPCC has been chosen as Lidl UK’s new charity partner, which is expected to raise £3m over the next three years.

The supermarket chain said the funds thus raised would go towards supporting the charity’s schools service, which aims to provide interactive assemblies and workshops in every primary school in the UK, designed to protect children from abuse.

The charity was chosen after a vote of Lidl’s 20,000 UK employees, who will be given the opportunity to volunteer with the charity and see its schools programme being run in primary schools close to where they work.

The children’s charity, which recently began a partnership with Morgan Stanley that is expected to be worth at least £1m over the next two years, said its arrangement with Lidl would be its first partnership with a major supermarket.

Peter Wanless, chief executive of the NSPCC, said the supermarket’s support would mean the charity could train enough volunteers to deliver its schools service to every primary school in the UK.

"This is especially important when you consider that two children in every classroom have suffered some form of abuse, a state of affairs that is completely unacceptable and cannot be allowed to continue," he said.

Christian Härtnagel, chief executive of Lidl UK, said: "This isn’t just a commitment from the business, but one from all of our employees who voted for our new charity partner.

"We were all incredibly inspired by the work that the NSPCC does and, together, we are dedicated to helping them provide the vital support needed to keep children safe so that they can grow up healthy and thrive."

If you’re interested in fundraising, you can’t miss Third Sector’s Annual Fundraising Conference on 23 and 24 May. Click here for more information and how to book

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