Lloyds Banking Group drops charity credit card scheme

Cards offered by Halifax and Bank of Scotland raised £18m for three charities over 23 years

Halifax
Halifax

Lloyds Banking Group will discontinue its charity credit card scheme, which has raised £18m for three charities over the past 23 years, because of limited demand.

The card is like a normal credit card but allows customers to make donations of between 0.25 and 0.5 per cent of the purchase to charity each time they use it. It has raised money for Cancer Research UK, the NSPCC and the SSPCA.

The cards were offered by Halifax and Bank of Scotland, held by HBOS, which was taken over by Lloyds Banking Group in 2009. Lloyds TSB does not offer its own charity credit card.

A spokeswoman for Lloyds Banking Group said the number of customers using the card had been in decline and the cards accounted for less than 1 per cent of all of the bank’s credit cards. She declined to reveal how many credit cards the bank had for commercial reasons.

"Following a recent review, which noted the limited demand for charity cards in recent years, we have decided that we will no longer offer a charity credit card," she said. "Lloyds Banking Group remain committed to charitable giving and will work to support Cancer Research UK, the NSPCC and the SSPCA in any way we can in the future."

The cards will no longer be charity cards from late February, but will become normal credit cards, the spokeswoman said.

Claire Rowney, head of corporate partnerships at CRUK, said the cards had raised £14.5m for the charity in 23 years. "While it’s disappointing that the partnership has come to an end, we would like to thank all Halifax and Bank of Scotland staff and customers who have supported us over the years," she said.

A spokeswoman for the NSPCC said: "HBOS has been a supporter of the NSPCC for many years and this has included the affinity card partnership since 2004.

"Though the card will stop next month, we have been very happy with our partnership with HBOS and we are exploring what other opportunities there are for us to work together in the future."

Gareth Thomas, the shadow minister for civil society, said: "Very few people will understand how a bank propped up by the taxpayer can adopt such a Scrooge-like attitude."

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