London campaign against bogus charitable collections

Police officers and local authority workers will distribute 200,000 leaflets today in support of the Support Charity Not Crime initiative, organised by the London Prevent Network and the Metropolitan Police

Charitable collections
Charitable collections

Up to 200,000 flyers will be distributed to people in London today as part of a campaign to prevent bogus charitable collections being used to support criminal activity.

Support Charity Not Crime, which is taking place for the second time in the capital today, encourages people to check whether the causes they give money to, particularly through public collections, are genuine.

The event, organised by the anti-terrorism group the London Prevent Network and the Metropolitan Police, will involve police officers and local authority workers distributing leaflets at such places as transport hubs and shopping centres.

"Most collections are genuine but, sadly, there are people who try to abuse the name of charity to divert donations for fraudulent purposes, including to fund organised crime or even terrorism," the leaflets say.

They urge people to check that any collector in a public place in London has a licence; that fundraising materials include the charity’s name, registration number and a landline contact number; that the collector has a genuine ID badge; and that any collection tin is sealed.

The campaign, which has been backed by the Charity Commission and the Fundraising Standards Board, is being promoted through social media using the Twitter account @SaferGiving and the hashtag #supportcharityNOTcrime.

The first pan-London safer giving day took place in March last year.

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