MEDIA DIGEST, 12 SEPTEMBER: fuel costs, apple orchards and Kevin Spacey

Third Sector's round-up of the news, including an attack on the Government's Warm Front scheme, a wildlife charity's fight to preserve orchards and plans for the Roy Castle foundation to expand

Age charities criticise Government scheme
Age Concern and Help the Aged, which are merging, have attacked the Government's Warm Front scheme, which was set up to help the elderly cope with soaring fuel costs. The charities are receiving increasing numbers of complaints about the scheme. "This is a flimsy and failing package that does little to help older people struggling to cope with soaring fuel bills," said Mervyn Kohler, special adviser at Help the Aged.
See bbc.co.uk for full story

Wildlife charity fights to save traditional orchards
A wildlife charity is calling on the public to help create a national map that lists the country's apple orchards. The People's Trust for Endangered Species revealed that traditional orchards have declined by almost 60 per cent over the past 50 years.
See bbc.co.uk for full story

Prince attends City fundraising day
Kevin Spacey, Jerry Hall and Prince Charles joined City bankers for a day of trading in aid of charities, including the Prince's Trust. Brokers BGC partners organised the annual fundraising event.
See Press Association for full story

Roy Castle foundation set to expand
The Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation has announced plans to expand. Paul Gauntlett, director of development at the charity, said: "We are developing more services for patients and carers. We want to expand our smoking cessation services to other areas of Britain and will reach more people." The Liverpool charity recently moved into new premises and appointed a new chief executive - Rosemary Gillespie.
See Liverpool Post for full story

Prince hosts reception for Marine Conservation Society
Prince Charles has spoken at a reception held to celebrate the Marine Conservation Society's 25th anniversary. The prince, who hosted the event at Clarence House in London, thanked celebrity botanist Professor David Bellamy, who he said was owed "incalculable debt" for his marine conservation work, as well as the "brave band of volunteers" who help to clear beaches of litter.
See telegraph.co.uk for full story

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