Mike Ashley appointed board member of the Charity Commission

Ashley is a non-executive director of Barclays and a member of the Treasury's audit committee, and will replace the departed Nazo Moosa

Mike Ashley
Mike Ashley

The Charity Commission has appointed Mike Ashley, a non-executive director at Barclays and member of HM Treasury’s audit committee, as a board member and chair of its audit and risk committee.

Ashley will serve a three-year term starting on 1 November. He succeeds Nazo Moosa, who stepped down from the role in September.

Ashley was formerly the head of quality and risk management for the accountancy firm KPMG and the firm’s designated ethics partner.

In between two spells at KPMG totalling about 35 years, he also spent two years as the chief finance officer of NatWest’s investment banking division.

He joined Barclays, where he also chairs the audit committee, in September 2013, at a time when the bank was going through a management shake-up in the wake of the Libor rate-fixing scandal. In addition to this and his Treasury role, he holds board or committee roles at the European Financial Reporting Advisory Group, the Government Internal Audit Agency and the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales.

A spokeswoman for the commission said board members were contracted to work up to 18 days a year for the regulator and paid a rate of £350 a day.

The appointment was made by the Cabinet Office, in line with the code of practice for public appointments. The Cabinet Office statement said: "The code of practice requires the disclosure of relevant and declarable political activity. No political activity was declared in his application."

Francis Maude, the Minister for the Cabinet Office, said: "Mike Ashley’s experience of audit and risk management will help the Charity Commission’s board as it continues to strengthen the regulator’s effectiveness and protect public trust and confidence in charities."

William Shawcross, chair of the commission, said Ashley would bring "very considerable skills and experience that will help us continue to strengthen our regulatory approach".

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