Movember co-founder says it will target female supporters in bid to reverse falling income

Adam Garone says its side campaign Move will challenge women to do something active for the charity, such as a yoga session or a short walk

Adam Garone
Adam Garone

Movember plans to target female supporters more this year and place more emphasis on its global parent charity the Movember Foundation as part of a new strategy aimed at reversing its falling income.

In an interview with Third Sector, Adam Garone, who co-founded Movember in Australia in 2004 and is chief executive of the parent charity, said he presented a strategy to address the decline in income to the charity’s board in December.

According to the Movember website, the amount raised in the UK so far from Movember 2014 was £9.6m from 138,541 participants – about a third of the funds and participants achieved two years ago.

Movember 2013 raised £20.5m in the UK, almost a quarter less than the £27.1m raised the year before.

Revenues have also been falling worldwide. The Movember website shows that the total raised so far for the campaign worldwide in 2014 was £50.2m, compared with £69.3m in 2013 and £71.8m in 2012.

Garone said that Movember 2015 would be accompanied by a side campaign called Move, which for the first time will challenge women to do something active for the charity, such as a yoga session or a short walk.

He said more focus would also be placed on the Movember Foundation and showcasing the work it does.

Supporters will be encouraged to run the London Marathon for the global charity, high-net-worth individuals will be targeted and fundraising dinners will be held, he said.

He said the charity had recognised that it needed to change.

"After the 2013 campaign, we felt it was just too early to change direction, but now we realise we need to," said Garone. "We need to preserve what we’ve got – this wonderful moustache-growing campaign. But we’re going to provide other ways for the community to engage in Movember and support the Movember Foundation year-round.

"We’ll be targeting Mo Sistas [female participants] to sign up and make a commitment to Move," he said. "We will tie that in with men’s health by asking women to challenge the men in their lives to also sign up to Move. The campaign is going to underscore the importance of being active as the most important thing you can do for your health."

Garone said that the charity also intended to unlock the "brand equity" of the Movember Foundation and get the public to understand that Movember was not just a short-term fundraising campaign and that they could support the charity year-round.

"We’ve got a number of unique global collaborative research programmes that no other cancer charity is able to achieve because at best they are national, so we’re going to go after high-net-worth individuals and get them to contribute to these high-impact programmes," he said.

Garone said the charity had also agreed partnerships with chefs, musicians and comedians who had participated in Movember and wanted to support the charity by working on fundraising dinners and other events.

Asked if this represented a change in thinking from 2012 – when Garone told Third Sector that "charity walks, runs and black-tie dinners are a dime a dozen" –  he said: "We won’t be doing 5km and 10k runs and black-tie dinners, I can guarantee you that. The commitment to Move and the way we’re going to market it – using tracking devices and apps and with fun and irreverence – will certainly differentiate us from everyone else."

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus