Breadcrumbs

Fundraisers welcome Boswell plans for new research body

By Kaye Wiggins, Third Sector Online, 11 December 2009

Chief executive of the Institute of Fundraising intends to set up new think tank to improve fundraising research

Fundraisers have welcomed Lindsay Boswell's decision to resign from the advisory panel for the Centre for Charitable Giving and Philanthropy and set up a new think tank to carry out fundraising research.

The Office of the Third Sector said it was disappointed and thanked Boswell for its contribution. It also echoed a statement from the Economic and Social Research Council, one of the funders of the centre, that its work will continue to support fundraisers.

Boswell, chief executive of the Institute of Fundraising, left the panel earlier this week because he felt it had failed to allocate funding to research in areas that would most benefit fundraisers.

The ESRC said in a statement: "We appreciate the involvement of the Institute of Fundraising in advising the work of the Centre for Charitable Giving and Philanthropy. The centre will continue to produce research that will inform and support the work of the fundraising community."

A spokesman for the Office of the Third Sector said: "We would like to thank Lindsay Boswell and the Institute of Fundraising for their contribution to the development of the Centre for Charitable Giving and Philanthropy so far, and express our disappointment that they have decided to resign from the centre's advisory board.

"We are fully supportive of the staff from the five high-quality institutions involved in the centre. It will continue to produce research that will inform and support the work of the fundraising community."

Mick Aldridge, chief executive of the Public Fundraising Regulatory Association, which wrote to the centre in October asking it to fund more research that would meet the "day-to-day information needs of fundraising professionals", said: "It is regrettable that Lindsay has been forced to make this stand, but is a classic case of having to speak truth unto power.

"The centre needs to sit up and listen to the collective voice of fundraisers who are telling them the research it is funding is of little use to them."

Alistair McLean, chief executive of the Fundraising Standards Board, said he was looking forward to working with the new think tank. "We asked the centre to allocate more funding to research on donor motivation, but it hasn't done so," he said.

"Hopefully the new think tank will start filling some of the gaps where research is needed."

Boswell told Third Sector he did not believe his resignation would prompt the centre to allocate more money to research projects that would be of practical use to fundraisers. It is due to announce next month how its remaining £600,000 will be spent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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