Peter Ainsworth reappointed as chair of the Big Lottery Fund for four years

The funder also reappoints Nat Sloane as chair of its England committee

Peter Ainsworth
Peter Ainsworth

Peter Ainsworth, chair of the Big Lottery Fund, and Nat Sloane, chair of the BLF’s England committee, have been reappointed to their roles at the funder for a further four years.

Natalie Campbell, founder of A Very Good Company, and Rachael Robathan, a Conservative councillor at Westminster City Council, have also been appointed to the board.

Rajay Naik, director of government and external affairs at the Open University, and a BLF board member for the past six years, has left the board.

The appointments, combined with other changes over the past year, mean the BLF board will increase from nine people in June 2014 to 12 from 1 June, when the new appointments take effect.

All of the new appointments, announced in a Cabinet Office statement last month, are for four years.

Ainsworth, who was the Conservative MP for East Surrey between 1992 and 2010, was first appointed BLF chair in June 2011 after the former chair Sir Clive Booth left in November 2010.

He is a founder member of the consultancy the Robertsbridge Group and chair of the charities Plantlife International and the Elgar Foundation.

Ainsworth will be paid £40,000 a year for the job, which is expected to take up 90 days a year. When he was appointed in 2011, he was paid at the rate of £21,600 for an average of six days a month, amounting to about 72 days a year.

This represents an 85 per cent increase in salary over four years for an increased time commitment of 25 per cent. BLF accounts show he received £28,800 in the years 2012/13 and 2013/14. A spokeswoman for the BLF said the increases came as the result of a benchmarking exercise.

Sloane, who also joined the board in 2011, was a co-founder of the Impetus Trust and is vice-chair of Impetus-PEF.

He will earn £24,000 for 60 days’ work a year, having previously earned between £18,000 and £24,000 for between 72 and 96 days a year.

"Peter and Nat’s experience will provide continuity during a challenging but exciting period of transition for the fund as it implements the recommendations from the recent triennial review," the Cabinet Office statement said.

Campbell, who like Robathan could be appointed for a further four years after her term expires, founded A Very Good Company in 2010 with the aim of stimulating social innovation in corporate responsibility departments in large companies. She is the chair of the National Council for Voluntary Youth Services and a fellow of the Clore Social Leadership Programme.

Robathan was elected to Westminster City Council in 2010 after a 20-year career in emerging markets investment management. Her council cabinet responsibilities include adult social care, rough sleeping and public health.

Campbell and Robathan will be paid £218 a day for 36 days a year.

Ainsworth said in a statement: "I am delighted to welcome both Rachael Robathan and Natalie Campbell to the Big Lottery Fund UK board. Both bring valuable experiences from the public, voluntary and commercial sectors to the board, providing further balance and expertise to our existing team."

The Cabinet Office said the appointments were made in accordance with the Code of Practice for Ministerial Appointments to Public Bodies. "All appointments are made on merit following fair and open competition," it said.

Over the past year, the BLF has increased the size of its board from nine to 12 members. Elizabeth Passey, a former managing director of Investec Asset Management, Perdita Fraser, an angel investor, and David Isaac, a partner at the law firm Pinsent Masons joined the board in 2014. Former vice-chair Anna Southall stepped down last year after coming to the end of her term.

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