Planet Charity: Gorilla naming in China

Plus: Outrage at opera's spending and techno becomes charitable in a Berlin nightspot

It won't be long before organisations stop asking the public to name things now that a baby gorilla in China has been given the moniker Harambe McHarambeface. In an online vote run by Jinhua Zoo in Zhejiang province, an estimated 73,000 people - more than 93 per cent - plumped for the name, a mash-up of Harambe, the gorilla who was shot at Cincinnati Zoo after a four-year-old boy fell into his enclosure this year, and the infamous Boaty McBoatface.

But officials at the zoo said the name was impossible to render in Chinese, so while the gorilla's English name will be Harambe McHarambeface, it will otherwise be called Heijin.

There's been a bit of a hoohah in Paris, France, where executives at the Paris National Opera have come under fire for spending public funds on taxis, food and a pricey redecoration. La Cour des Comptes, France's top audit institution, criticised them for spending £80,000 on taxis in 2014, £45,000 on restaurants and £51,000 on renovating the deputy director's office, including a new carpet. "I don't think it's wrong to want to change the carpet," said Jean-Phillippe Thiellay, who took up the deputy director role at the opera in 2014.

In Germany, a nightclub in Berlin has edged closer to the voluntary sector after a court ruled that it produced work of cultural significance and should be allowed to pay a lower tax rate. Berghain, famed for its dark, industrial techno, should be classified as providing cultural events rather than mere entertainment, the court decided, so it will pay a reduced rate of 7 per cent on its earnings, rather than the normal 19 per cent. This puts it in the same bracket as theatres and museums.

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