Prince's Trust defends use of £2.5m legacy

The Prince's Trust has insisted that it used a £1m legacy in accordance with the legator's wishes after criticism came from his family.

Annabel Kanabus, whose son Jason died of cancer aged 30, demanded this week that the charity return the money he left in his will, according to a report in The Guardian. The charity has so far received £1m of the £2.5m legacy, but Kanabus reportedly wants the money returned because she claims the trust has not provided evidence to show that the beneficiaries have gone on to find work in farming, as specified in the will.

The charity said that in the eight months since it received the money it had already helped 40 young people, three in four of whom have gone on to work or training. The charity said that it was disappointed that the family had not visited the young people who have benefited from the legacy.

“The allegations made by the Kanabus family are completely untrue,” said a Prince’s Trust spokesman. “At the family’s request, we are using only the income from Jason’s legacy.

“The family sent the trust £1m only eight months ago. The income so far from that £1m has already helped about 40 young people in rural communities, with three in four moving into work or training. We will be seeking payment of the remainder of Jason's legacy so that the trust can give effect to Jason’s wishes.”

He added: “We have invited the family to visit the young people who have benefited in the eight short months but as yet none of them has taken us up on our offer.”

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