Public trust in charities falls | Charity Commission was urged to investigate Rowntree Trust | Charities spent £400k on trademark dispute

Plus: Kids Company got no 'special treatment' | Tough new clauses for charities bill | Tributes paid to former Alzheimer's director, Liz Monks

Charities are now trusted less by the public than supermarkets and the Royal Family after falling four places to 12th in the list of most trusted organisations and institutions in the UK, according to the latest data from the research consultancy nfpSynergy.

The collapsed charity Kids Company was not given special treatment when it was handed £46m of public money over 15 years, according to the civil servant Chris Wormald, permanent secretary at the Department for Education.

Two new amendments to the charities bill will be proposed that would enable the government to introduce statutory regulation for fundraising if necessary and force charities to join the new fundraising regulator, Sir Stuart Etherington has said.

The Charity Commission was urged by one of its board members to open a statutory inquiry into the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust earlier this year even though he thought the move might be challenged in the courts.

A judge has criticised two educational charities, NOCN and OCN Credit4Learning for spending more than £400,000 in legal fees on a trademark dispute that he said could have been settled out of court.

Tributes have been paid to Liz Monks, former director of fundraising at the Alzheimer's Society, who has died of cancer aged 48. Monks, whose career in the charity sector spanned more than 20 years, died in the early hours of Thursday morning.

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