Rob Wilson gives fundraising self-regulation 'window of opportunity' to reform | Big Lottery Fund opens £45m grant fund for organisations for women and girls | Board of the Kiltwalk resigns

Plus: Sector figures knighted in Birthday Honours | Merged breast cancer charity is Breast Cancer Now | Self-regulation of fundraising isn't working, says Etherington

Rob Wilson
Rob Wilson

Rob Wilson, the Minister for Civil Society, has given the fundraising self-regulation regime "an opportunity to demonstrate that it can work effectively", but has warned that the window in which it can do so "may not remain open for much longer".

The Big Lottery Fund has opened a new £45m grant fund to increase the capacity of organisations that support women and girls. The scheme, which does not have an official name but is being referred to as the women and girls initiative, will offer grants of between £150,000 and £750,000 to somewhere between 60 and 70 organisations in England over the next three to five years.

The trustees of the charity fundraising charity the Kiltwalk have resigned to be replaced by representatives of the philanthropist Sir Tom Hunter’s foundation. The Kiltwalk, which organises sponsored walks with people wearing kilts to raise funds for children's charities in Scotland, announced in March that Carey McEvoy, its founder and chief executive, would stand down after four charities cut ties with it, two of them citing concerns about the amount of funds they received from the events.

Ciarán Devane, chief executive of the British Council, has received a knighthood in the Queen’s Birthday Honours, which include many people from charities and the voluntary sector. Knighthoods go also to Kevan Collins, chief executive of the Education Endowment Foundation, which works to raise attainment among disadvantaged children, and Nicholas Penny, director general of the National Gallery.

The charity formed by the merger of Breast Cancer Campaign and Breakthrough Breast Cancer has renamed as Breast Cancer Now. The charity announced the new name to the wider public through a television advertising campaign on Monday evening.

The self-regulation of funding is "not working in its current form" and the Institute of Fundraising should consider relinquishing control of the Code of Fundraising Practice, Sir Stuart Etherington, chief executive of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, has said.

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