Say 'no' to budget cuts to survive the recession, fundraisers told

Fundraisers must refuse to allow their budgets to be cut if they are to survive the impending recession, delegates at next week's Scottish Institute of Fundraising conference will hear.

Elischer: 'maintain your budgets'
Elischer: 'maintain your budgets'

Tony Elischer, managing director of Think Consulting Solutions, will present ideas from his latest paper, Recession - Watching Is Not An Option. He will tell fundraisers, particularly from small and medium-sized charities, that they must maintain their budgets and invest more, despite the difficult economic conditions that are predicted.

"Fundraising is the life-line of most organisations," Elischer told Third Sector before the conference. "The chief executives and the finance directors are going to start cutting budgets and the fundraisers are going to have to dig their heels in and say 'absolutely not'."

Elischer will talk about how the recession will affect income from corporates, individuals and foundations; the characteristics of different types of recession and how to plan for each kind; how fundraising techniques such as events and direct marketing could be affected; and tips on staying afloat through the downturn.

Elischer also said fundraisers would have to make some tough decisions. "It's time to get rid of anything that is underperforming - that includes people," he said. "When we emerge from this, we can be much stronger as a sector and it will be fundraisers' hard work, adaptability and decisive planning that will get us through."

STAYING ALIVE

Elischer's tips on surviving different scenarios:

V-shaped recession - This is a sharp fall, followed by a recovery: maintain your fundraising profile and increase your investment as the market rebounds

U-shaped recession - This is a slower recovery: you should maintain your fundraising investment to take advantage of the recovery period

L-shaped recovery - This is a long-term recession: plan for survival; mergers and acquisitions are likely.

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