Sector gets behind Race Online 2012's digital drive

The NCVO and the Big Lottery Fund are among those urging charities to boost efficiency by improving their use of technology

Martha Lane Fox
Martha Lane Fox

A coalition of charities and third sector organisations, including the National Council for Voluntary Organisations and the Big Lottery Fund, is calling on charity leaders to improve their use of technology to save money and reach their audiences more effectively.

The group has created a free online book, Survive and Thrive, edited by Race Online 2012 - the cross-sector partnership programme launched by the UK's digital champion Martha Lane Fox - as part of the campaign to make the UK the first country where everyone can access the web.

The book contains case studies from several charities, including Carers UK and Beatbullying, that demonstrate how technology can increase efficiency and effectiveness. All of the case studies are also available on the Third Sector website.

The publication is a collaboration between Race Online 2012 and Comic Relief, the Big Lottery Fund, the NCVO, the Charity Commission, the Charities Aid Foundation, the Media Trust, New Philanthropy Capital, Acevo, Navca, iT4Communities, Lasa and CTT.

"It has never been more urgent that charities think internet first," said Lane Fox. "For their own survival in today's tough funding environment, but also because technology is now key to unlocking some of our most entrenched social problems, from wellbeing and worklessness to health problems and social isolation.

"There are so many free resources out there to support charities as they learn how technology can help them deliver their important work better - whether that's to fundraise, mobilise supporters, influence policy, vividly demonstrate your impact or reach more people in very difficult personal circumstances with vital advice and support."

Read more of what Lane Fox has to say in her exclusive opinion piece for Third Sector and read the case studies from Survive and Thrive

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