Sir Stephen Bubb urges committee of MPs to hold another session

Acevo chief executive says he wants to 'put the record straight' over criticism of charities

Sir Stephen Bubb
Sir Stephen Bubb

Sir Stephen Bubb, chief executive of Acevo, has written to the chair of the Public Administration Select Committee requesting another meeting to "put the record straight" on issues such as charity funding and campaigning.

Sir Stuart Etherington, chief executive of the NCVO, and Thomas Hughes-Hallett, chief executive of Marie Curie Cancer Care, appeared before the committee last week in a session to discuss voluntary sector funding.

During the meeting, some charities were criticised for concentrating too much on advertising and campaigning, and the funding of the sector was also discussed.

Bubb has written to the MPs who took part in the session to invite them to meet third sector chief executives "for a spot of debate and exchange of views", and to put the record straight, he said in a blog post.

Ralph Michell, head of policy at Acevo, told Third Sector that some of the things said at the meeting were shocking.

"If anyone unfamiliar with the sector based their opinion of it on what was said during the meeting they would come out with a very distorted view," he said.

Michell said it was important for the committee to meet other sector representatives so that the record could be set straight.

A spokesman for the PASC said it had received Bubb's request and had taken written evidence from him. He said this evidence would be represented in the committee's own report to be published before 9 March, which is the deadline for submissions to the consultation on the Giving Green Paper.

He said the committee's next meeting on voluntary sector funding would be on 16 February, when it would hear from Nick Hurd, the Minister for Civil Society, and Justine Greening, economic secretary to the Treasury.

The spokesman said it would consider whether to organise any more public hearings, but added that the committee had a tight schedule.

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