Society lotteries raise a record £175m for good causes in 2013/14

Figures from the Gambling Commission show that the amount raised was £22m more than in the previous year

Society lotteries
Society lotteries

Society lotteries raised a record £175m for good causes in 2013/14, £22m more than in the previous year, new figures from the Gambling Commission show.

The amounts were raised in the year to March 2014 by society lotteries with a licence from the Gambling Commission, which are lotteries that have income in an individual draw of more than £20,000 or an aggregate lottery income in a calendar year of more than £250,000.

The figures, published at the end of last month, show that the amount raised for good causes through society lotteries has increased from £100.6m in 2009/10 to £175.1m in 2013/14.

They show that there were 461 non-commercial society lotteries holding 770 licences on 30 September 2014. This is up from 419 operators holding 515 licences on 31 March 2010.

The total amount raised for good causes through society lotteries has increased significantly since the Health Lottery, made up of 51 society lotteries acting under one brand, entered the market in October 2011.

The amount raised for good causes as a proportion of total lottery income increased from 45 to 46 per cent in 2013/14 compared with the previous year, and expenses fell from 38 to 35 per cent.

The Lotteries Council, which represents charity lotteries, used the figures to reiterate its call for further reductions on the restrictions on society lotteries, which it said would raise more for good causes.

Clive Mollett, chair of the Lotteries Council, said he hoped that the latest results would demonstrate that a growing society lottery sector represented no threat to the National Lottery and was "firmly in the national interest".

The Lotteries Council wants changes, including an increase in the annual income cap on any society lottery from £10m to £100m and an increase in the permissible amount of ticket sales for a single draw from £4m to £10m.

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